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kimchi
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19/11/2019 4:43 pm  
Posted by: @89c51
And yes we had advancements with stuff like T6/honeycomb cores etc that lonz mentioned but none of these reached the average snowboard you buy now. Those are still more precisely made wood and glass boards.

Is anyone using honeycomb tech nowadays? Burton and Palmer went big on it in the mid-aughts, I'm not sure if I've heard about anyone using this stuff in like 10+ years.


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matty
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19/11/2019 4:54 pm  

I think that there have been advancements in a few significant areas that make boards across a production run more consistent than they used to be in the 90s. Engineered wooden cores, more use of carbon or basalt stringers, carbon or bamboo "pop rods", and more options for fiberglass weave patterns and additives like cork or urethane pads have all made a difference. Capita is putting forged carbon in some of their boards, which is a product that didn't even exist ten years ago, let alone 25. Also (as previously noted by Lonz), precision core profiling has taken some big steps forward. I think that CAD milling of cores is more standardized now than it was 25 years ago, and that automation and repeatability helps with consistency.

It's probably also worth noting that snowboard design has taken big steps forward: hybrid camber profiles; edges with multiple contact points; standardization of 4x2, 4x4, and channel for mounting options; an industry-wide move away from cap construction in favor of sidewalls; more progressive and quadratic sidecuts; and shaped base profiles are all newer developments that have been enabled by CAD-based development, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing improvements.


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matty
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19/11/2019 5:01 pm  
Posted by: @kimchi
Posted by: @89c51
And yes we had advancements with stuff like T6/honeycomb cores etc that lonz mentioned but none of these reached the average snowboard you buy now. Those are still more precisely made wood and glass boards.

Is anyone using honeycomb tech nowadays? Burton and Palmer went big on it in the mid-aughts, I'm not sure if I've heard about anyone using this stuff in like 10+ years.

A couple of ski companies are, but I'm not aware of any snowboard companies that do. There are some that are using next-level composite engineered wood cores, though. Capita's Surflite 2.0 core is balsa blocks with some poplar blocks in the mix and beech top and bottom caps with forged carbon plates under the bindings.


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 Anonymous
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20/11/2019 1:09 am  

finally decent graphics for the Thinker series


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Vanni
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20/11/2019 5:24 am  
Posted by: @matty

I think that there have been advancements in a few significant areas that make boards across a production run more consistent than they used to be in the 90s. Engineered wooden cores, more use of carbon or basalt stringers, carbon or bamboo "pop rods", and more options for fiberglass weave patterns and additives like cork or urethane pads have all made a difference. Capita is putting forged carbon in some of their boards, which is a product that didn't even exist ten years ago, let alone 25. Also (as previously noted by Lonz), precision core profiling has taken some big steps forward. I think that CAD milling of cores is more standardized now than it was 25 years ago, and that automation and repeatability helps with consistency.

It's probably also worth noting that snowboard design has taken big steps forward: hybrid camber profiles; edges with multiple contact points; standardization of 4x2, 4x4, and channel for mounting options; an industry-wide move away from cap construction in favor of sidewalls; more progressive and quadratic sidecuts; and shaped base profiles are all newer developments that have been enabled by CAD-based development, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing improvements.

I'm into snowboards since 2011, and even in this small amount of time, I felt some changes in snowboard design, IMO.

I think they tried to give to the boards more pop, in the beginning.

then I think they tried to retain the same amount of pop, but making the boards softer, and easier to ride at the end of the day, when the snow is not perfect anymore, making the boards damper.

skidding turns since 2011


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unsuspected
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20/11/2019 7:02 am  

Some more Nitro

180cm I 87kg-142kg I 270MP
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 Anonymous
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20/11/2019 9:30 am  

Burton Free/Deep Thinker reminds me of a Nitro I used to have back in the mid 90s.


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pow_hnd
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20/11/2019 12:21 pm  
Posted by: @matty

I think that there have been advancements in a few significant areas that make boards across a production run more consistent than they used to be in the 90s. Engineered wooden cores, more use of carbon or basalt stringers, carbon or bamboo "pop rods", and more options for fiberglass weave patterns and additives like cork or urethane pads have all made a difference. Capita is putting forged carbon in some of their boards, which is a product that didn't even exist ten years ago, let alone 25. Also (as previously noted by Lonz), precision core profiling has taken some big steps forward. I think that CAD milling of cores is more standardized now than it was 25 years ago, and that automation and repeatability helps with consistency.

It's probably also worth noting that snowboard design has taken big steps forward: hybrid camber profiles; edges with multiple contact points; standardization of 4x2, 4x4, and channel for mounting options; an industry-wide move away from cap construction in favor of sidewalls; more progressive and quadratic sidecuts; and shaped base profiles are all newer developments that have been enabled by CAD-based development, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing improvements.

I agree with most of this, production techniques/methods have gotten better, which has yielded better products for all of the snowboarding world. As some else stated back in the day Mervins fell apart all the time due to shitty production quality control. But as far a tech advances, I think for the most part the are all window dressing. As stated, honeycomb came and went, aluminum cores came and went, Titinal came and went and is now back, at one point 10 years ago DD was claiming that Nug boards were the future and soon they would be all boards, don’t see those in Burtons lineup anymore. As far a Surflite 2.0, let give it a few seasons to see if they hold up, the industry tried super light back in the late 90s/early 00s and the results weren’t good, shit broke. Surflite 1.0 didn’t have good results, people broke those like toys. 

So outside of rocker/camber combo, the biggest advancement really has just been production quality in my eyes. 

Shit, right now anyone can call up GP87 and get quality boards made and start a brand. That couldn’t be said 20 years ago. Getting into a quality production facility back then was tough. 

So, IMO, really boards haven’t changed, they’re still wood, glass and p-tex. Different brands will throw some different shit in, but in the end, I feel with today’s production quality, it really comes down to who has the best specs/shapes/profile/sidecut/flex. 

On a side note, I agree with a few other peoples view that actually having a little heavier board rides better. At my age I’m not in the park, ever. So a little more weight really helps to dampen the ride and crush the chunder at the end of a pow day. 

But, different strokes for different folks. 


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unsuspected
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20/11/2019 12:37 pm  

@dub_dainjah

Nitro copying Burton graphics and vice versa

Is that the one with the car on the base and Hustler bindings?

180cm I 87kg-142kg I 270MP
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Lalune
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20/11/2019 5:19 pm  
Posted by: @matti86

finally decent graphics for the Thinker series

I am gonna double stock this winter's Keith Haring collab.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Lalune

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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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21/11/2019 6:00 am  

@unsuspected

Yea it is, awesome you knew that! Great board for its time.


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unsuspected
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21/11/2019 6:13 am  

@dub_dainjah

Like that one and the one with the cobra snake with wheels.

180cm I 87kg-142kg I 270MP
Go wide!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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22/11/2019 8:14 am  

blacked out burton topsheets lookin GOOD 


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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22/11/2019 8:33 am  

couldn't get my hands on a Gonz but still stoked my 2019 Deep Thinker graphic over this year's and next.  I replaced the Tron stomp pad with a Dakine primo and blacked out the channel so there's no more neon.

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uninc
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02/12/2019 9:17 am  

IMG 2617
IMG 2613
IMG 2612 (1)

Paramount, Custom base and...


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