The Official Splitb...
 

The Official Splitboard Splitty Thread  

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kimchi
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09/01/2019 11:15 am  

I picked up some 32 TM2 XLT Jones variants for touring because I didn't want to wreck my Adidas. Pretty burly. I'm surprised they're not marketed as split-specific boots. Powerstrap, half gaiter, flexible elastic spot around the calf, heel welt for a crampon, SUPER burly Vibram outsole.

Took 'em out at Northstar a couple days ago to get them dialed. Breaking these in is going to suck, but I made a pretty good purchase.

This post was modified 6 months ago 2 times by kimchi

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coleslawed
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09/01/2019 4:52 pm  

they’re pretty specifically marketed for the touring crowd. 

6’/275 lbs./US 10.5
Vans Hi Standard Pro/Union Strata/Contact Pro
ATV 158/HPS 158/Café Racer 156/Helix 156w
directional-twin/camber/tight sidecuts
𝔢𝔞𝔱 𝔭𝔦𝔷𝔷𝔞.


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Hai
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09/01/2019 5:16 pm  
Posted by: coleslawed

they’re pretty specifically marketed for the touring crowd. 

The Jones MTB is, not sure about the XLT, seems more of a freeride boot


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kimchi
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10/01/2019 9:30 am  
Posted by: Hai
Posted by: coleslawed

they’re pretty specifically marketed for the touring crowd. 

The Jones MTB is, not sure about the XLT, seems more of a freeride boot

Yep. Jones has 2 pro boots with 32:

  • $600 Jones MTB with the full gaiter and that crazy boa walking mode.
  • Jones TM2 XLT which is a beefed up TM2.

Former is 100% obviously a touring boot, latter marketed more as a general "freeride" boot but feels like a hybrid mountaineer / snowboard boot. Not up to the level of a Fitwell, but on par with say Deeluxe Spark XV or K2 Aspect.


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coleslawed
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12/01/2019 7:55 pm  

I’ve got a spare set of Voile pucks if anyone needs them, $20 plus shipping 

6’/275 lbs./US 10.5
Vans Hi Standard Pro/Union Strata/Contact Pro
ATV 158/HPS 158/Café Racer 156/Helix 156w
directional-twin/camber/tight sidecuts
𝔢𝔞𝔱 𝔭𝔦𝔷𝔷𝔞.


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Muskrat
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19/01/2019 9:18 am  

Leaving brand/gear debates out of it, where do I start with a first split trip? A skier friend and I are hoping to plan a /split touring trip about a year out. Can I get into this without avi training and all that? Pop for a couple day course and get it over with? Guides are nice but $$$$$. We’re in Wisconsin but will be doing Icon pass assuming it’s still around. Rough idea is a week trip 50% resort 50% out of bounds. Share your wisdom


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tp1_kenobi
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20/01/2019 6:57 pm  

I wouldn't ever advise anyone not to take any training before heading out there whether it's instructed or self learned.  At the end of the day, it's whomever you go out with that you risk.  Once you understand terrain, then that will limit your choices on where you go and what you're willing to accept.

Some non-pro tips:

  1. Read up and educate yourself:  https://www.amazon.com/Staying-Alive-Avalanche-Terrain-Tremper/dp/1594850844
  2. If you don't plan on spending money for guides, find locals who are willing to show you around.  I would SERIOUSLY advise you to get the minimum shovel, probe, beacon and learn how to use that before even asking a local on taking your around.  If you can't figure out how to deploy a probe or the techniques on eye-stabbing someone who is buried no one with half a brain will take you out there
  3. If you've got the split setup already, practice using that at a resort.  Hike a hill, learn how to do kick turn, set a trail, put on skins when it's whipping with wind
  4. Practice search and rescue with your beacons

There's tons of stuff you can do w/ splits and not need to leave your resort/area. 

Regarding areas in the US, I ran into some Colorado guys out in Japan doing some splitting and they said it's sketch in their backyard due to snowpack, sun, and general conditions.  Obviously, not all Colorado is like this, but these guys were lamenting on it.

Splitting is fucking amazing when done right with the right crew.  You just don't want to be THAT guy.

 

This post was modified 5 months ago by tp1_kenobi

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tp1_kenobi
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20/01/2019 7:05 pm  

Back to touring boots, can anyone else provide feedback on what else is out there and their experiences?  I've been on my Lunarendor's and they've been thrashed.

I've seen Burton's offering, but I haven't been all that impressed with their boots packing out (that was in 08/09 though).  Definitely curious on 32, Deelux, et. al...


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pow_hnd
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20/01/2019 7:47 pm  
Posted by: Muskrat

Leaving brand/gear debates out of it, where do I start with a first split trip? A skier friend and I are hoping to plan a /split touring trip about a year out. Can I get into this without avi training and all that? Pop for a couple day course and get it over with? Guides are nice but $$$$$. We’re in Wisconsin but will be doing Icon pass assuming it’s still around. Rough idea is a week trip 50% resort 50% out of bounds. Share your wisdom

Honestly, the only problem you will encounter will be yourself. Splitting is all about self-control first, and then knowledge second.  I know a lot of people with a shit load of knowledge that have bad self-control/self-restraint and I won’t split with them. Shit, I split 80% of the time by myself and have been for more than 20 years. What I posses is the ability to happy as a pig in shit on 25˚ slope as long as it’s pow. I’m not tempted by the steeps. It doesn’t mean that I don’t get out on those slopes, but its only a few times a year and always when conditions are safe and I’m with people who are safe. 

As suggested, read Staying Alive in Avalanche terrain. Read it cover to cover, twice. I re-read it every fall and have been for over 15 years. 

Then stay in a small group. Recent data has shown, that every person you add to a group over 4 people exponentially increases your chance of being involved in an incident. Herd mentality is a bitch. Lots of experts are even starting to say now that AFTER 3 people you start reaching the point of diminishing returns. 

https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(15)00461-5/abstract

If you read up and train yourself, the Wasatch would maybe be a great place to start. We have hands down the best resources in the nation for getting out there. 

You can put the Wasatch Backcountry Skiing Map on your phone and use it VIA GPS to self guide.  Here’s a link to its web portal. 

http://wbskiing.com

Then you can use its companion web site, Wasatch Backcountry Skiing Guide Book, to plan your day. It’s super handy and even clearly shows runs under 30˚ so you can stay on mellow slopes without guessing, and know before hand that the slope you are going to is gonna be 30˚ or under and put yourself in the best position possible when you’re just beginning. 

https://wbsguide.com/index.php

Here’s my go to, solo day, favorite area/run, Short Swing. I’ve literally done this run/area 150+ times in my 13 years of living here.

https://wbsguide.com/2124.php

All in all, self control/good judgement is really the killer, yes, taking a class is clearly beneficial, but you need to be able to utilize the skills acquired with restraint. The truth is, some people have restraint and some people don’t. If you’re in the latter group and have had self-restraint/self-control/impulse-action issues in life, I suggest staying on the lifts. 

While guides are and can be great, they are the same as everybody else, humans that can lack in self-control, and sometimes they have god complex issues. We had a very well known guide here in the Wasatch a few years ago lose a client. The client was wearing an airbag as well and it did deploy and he was still buried about 4’ under.  My point is, too many people can just blindly put their trust in these things, wether it be a guide or an airbag.

https://utahavalanchecenter.org/avalanche/26182

There is no way to be completely safe, but good judgement/self-control will keep you safer than anything else ever will, be it guide or equipment. 

This post was modified 5 months ago 3 times by pow_hnd

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nmb
 nmb
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20/01/2019 7:53 pm  

thanks for writing that out..great information. 

skier


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CaptainLurk
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20/01/2019 8:17 pm  
Posted by: nmb

thanks for writing that out..great information. 

So much wisdom! Real talk @pow_hnd

Squashballer👐


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Mariner9
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21/01/2019 11:45 am  

"Back to touring boots, can anyone else provide feedback on what else is out there and their experiences?"

I have a pair of the 32 MTBs. I find the boa for walk mode helps a lot - lengthens your stride and makes touring more comfortable. Apparently there were problems with the durability of the boa cable on the first year's model; I got the second iteration and it's been fine so far. I had to size up by a half (US) size versus my Burton boots (Driver X). I find them stiffer than the Driver X but that might just reflect having ridden a lower number of days in the MTBs. 

 


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Mariner9
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21/01/2019 12:03 pm  

"where do I start with a first split trip?"

What tp1_kenobi said.

I second the recommendation for the Bruce Tremper book. If the full version seems like too much, there's a shorter version. I find myself re-reading the full book periodically, both for a refresh and because it makes more sense as you gain experience and can relate what he says to what you've seen.

The 'Avalanche Accidents in Canada' books are worth skimming (you can find volumes 3 and 4 online for free). They give a summary of what % of accidents occur with different danger ratings, slope aspects, steepness, etc. Related to that, I recommend getting (or just looking at) the Avaluator. Really distills down the important factors for decision making.

If you split the cost of a guide between you and your friends, it should be affordable. And I would guess you can find a guide who splits rather than ski tours (easy enough in BC, anyway). 

As far as training goes, CAA Level 1 (two days of classroom and field training) costs ~CA$250 (~US$190), which isn't much in the grand scheme of things. Not sure what the US equivalent is but no doubt someone else does and can chime in.

EDIT: Bruce Kay's book is also worth reading simply because it hammers home the importance of human factors to travelling in avalanche terrain. This is covered to a lesser extent by Tremper.

HTH. 

This post was modified 5 months ago by Mariner9

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tp1_kenobi
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22/01/2019 3:44 pm  
Posted by: Mariner9

"Back to touring boots, can anyone else provide feedback on what else is out there and their experiences?"

I have a pair of the 32 MTBs. I find the boa for walk mode helps a lot - lengthens your stride and makes touring more comfortable. Apparently there were problems with the durability of the boa cable on the first year's model; I got the second iteration and it's been fine so far. I had to size up by a half (US) size versus my Burton boots (Driver X). I find them stiffer than the Driver X but that might just reflect having ridden a lower number of days in the MTBs. 

 

Thanks for that and the sizing heads up.  What's your binding setup?   Any sizing issues interfacing the boot to your bindings?

 


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kimchi
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22/01/2019 5:12 pm  
Posted by: Mariner9

As far as training goes, CAA Level 1 (two days of classroom and field training) costs ~CA$250 (~US$190), which isn't much in the grand scheme of things. Not sure what the US equivalent is but no doubt someone else does and can chime in.

Private AIARE Level 1 courses range from $350-500 USD typically. I got mine significantly cheaper going through Lake Tahoe Community College. I think I paid like $80.


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