The Official Splitb...
 

The Official Splitboard Splitty Thread  

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MarkusM
(@markusm)
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07/04/2019 1:29 am  

center rocker is a gimmick


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Elektropow
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07/04/2019 2:39 am  
Posted by: MarkusM

center rocker is a gimmick

Hah! I'm willing to let that slide (pun intended) since we're on a split thread 😉


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Spenser
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07/04/2019 3:58 am  

Haha, I had a feeling that would happen with you guys

Yeah, it’s just a splitboard thing. My thought is that if it’s not good for going up, it doesn’t matter what it’s like going down. A split should be a functional tool first, and a decent board second. Since virtually all snowboards are good these days, and all you have to do is choose one that at least relatively fits your preferences, the latter is not something to worry about.


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Elektropow
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07/04/2019 4:07 am  

The BRD is something I'd seriously consider if I were to get into splitting now. Just a bit bummed always waiting for a couple guys this season who are on TNT bases, fresh waxed or not. No biggie if there's a consistent downslope.


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kimchi
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08/04/2019 10:05 am  
Posted by: kimchi

Got out on my first tour in over a year, since I got Avy I cert last February. A lap through Lassen National Park. Felt way better than last season.  Overhauled my split setup pretty dramatically over the off-season, so not sure what exactly contributed what, but I felt much soooo more comfortable.

Went out again the day after (Sunday) and was completely humbled. I was feeling pretty good after keeping up and feeling great day 1. But team switched up from day 1 to day 2, I went from being middle of pack fitness to weak link in fitness. Conditions on day 2 were also garbage, it rained a bit overnight and snow never froze over, so it was loose wet and gloppy grabby snow. Both touring and riding were way more challenging.

All in all, great weekend. Met some new folks, learned a lot. The riding wasn't epic but I got a handful of awesome dream turns, learned a lot about team dynamics, and just got better at splitting. I put in 20x the effort to get 1/10th the vert, but it was fantastic.


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Spenser
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10/04/2019 3:23 am  

4945F6FF 9D5D 4902 A209 95132AB41D22


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psklt
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10/04/2019 7:26 am  

looks solid! are you running Surge's with burton straps? and you switched to the ultra clips, happier with them?

and damn that things got a hell of a nose..looks like a blast

This post was modified 2 months ago by psklt

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psklt
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10/04/2019 7:39 am  

515FB160 E566 46BE 9FB6 4ABC672DD56D


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Spenser
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10/04/2019 12:30 pm  
Posted by: psklt

looks solid! are you running Surge's with burton straps? and you switched to the ultra clips, happier with them?

and damn that things got a hell of a nose..looks like a blast

They ended up as a surges, hah. Started with the blaze years ago, upgraded to the Tesla baseplate when they came out, then upgraded highbacks when they came out. I’ve always just used whichever straps I like at the time, which for the past couple years has been those, on all my bindings

I think the slight above-angle of the photo exaggerates the nose, but it definitely does have a mighty horn.

First I’ll say I probably wouldn’t notice anything while riding, but definitely like the ultra clip function better in general. The sparks just didn’t really tickle my fancy after tinkering, and I had a couple issues with the hardware, but I’m sure others love them. System seems cool, although maybe overly complicated?

This post was modified 2 months ago by Spenser

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Hai
 Hai
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10/04/2019 3:59 pm  
Posted by: kimchi
Posted by: kimchi

Got out on my first tour in over a year, since I got Avy I cert last February. A lap through Lassen National Park. Felt way better than last season.  Overhauled my split setup pretty dramatically over the off-season, so not sure what exactly contributed what, but I felt much soooo more comfortable.

Went out again the day after (Sunday) and was completely humbled. I was feeling pretty good after keeping up and feeling great day 1. But team switched up from day 1 to day 2, I went from being middle of pack fitness to weak link in fitness. Conditions on day 2 were also garbage, it rained a bit overnight and snow never froze over, so it was loose wet and gloppy grabby snow. Both touring and riding were way more challenging.

All in all, great weekend. Met some new folks, learned a lot. The riding wasn't epic but I got a handful of awesome dream turns, learned a lot about team dynamics, and just got better at splitting. I put in 20x the effort to get 1/10th the vert, but it was fantastic.

haha I feel ya. Half my friends are skiers so trying to keep up with them is always a challenge, especially with any traversing and/or laps where transitioning takes twice as long. Good touring partners and group dynamics are key to keeping safe out there and having fun even in shitty conditions for sure.


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drmoebius
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16/04/2019 7:02 am  

tl;dr: If you are in the market for new splitboard bindings/boots, seriously do consider hardboots.

It's not as if I am the first one to try out this whole "Touring Skiboot on a Splitboard" thing. But as far as I can tell most people use regular climbing wires. Actually did the same at first, but since I bought the ski touring bindings with the heel-brackets included, I figured I'd try them too. Producing those adapter plates was not really difficult and one could simply drill the brackets into the board, but I did not want to do that. There are minor weight disadvantages - the whole setup without boots (which interestingly enough are pretty much the same weight as a Driver X) comes in at 2,280 grams per "ski" - which is still about 500 grams lighter than the previous setup with Spark Afterburners. 

So why would you want to use those heel brackets anyway? After getting used to the motion, they can be flipped up and down while standing straight, which rarely ever worked with the spark climbing wires and also not really with the old style climbing wires that one tends to use on a hardboot splitboard. When the shit hits the fan I can also actually ski down in those things. Not the most enjoyable ride, but definitely doable. 

If any of you are curious why I ventured down the skiboot route: Basically whenever you tour with skier friends, which is sadly my reality, you are the one playing catchup. I do hike regularly, but there is just no getting around the fact that skiers have way less weight per foot to haul up the mountain and this simply means that they will be either faster or they will need less energy. There is also the added factor or longer strides, but of course one could get special splitboard boots for that. If you fancy touring regularly you will also encounter icy and steep slopes, in those even afterburners + Driver X's felt imprecise. Again, your skier buddies struggle less there. So what started out as a quest to simply make my splitboard lighter led me towards those hardboots. 

They simply are way better on the ascent, there is no way around it. The whole setup is lighter. The stride in flat sections is way longer. When stuff gets gnarlier, the edgehold is better. Kickturns are easier (since basically every Splitboard has the holes for the brackets at the center point instead of more towards the nose and also because the pivot-point in the skiboots is right at your toes and not somewhere beneath them). 

For the descent I carry the spark Dyno DHs in my backpack, these are mounted on canted pucks. The boots themselves I haven't modified at all yet. I'll probably drill out the forward lean at some point, but for that one ride down they are good enough. Seriously not much different to the Driver  X I had before. I do get a somewhat cramped feeling in my front foot tigh, but it's only really bad on groomers and as I said, I just did not modify the boots at all yet.

blah


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Velvet Hammer
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16/04/2019 9:25 am  

Why not just start skiing. You are 75% of the way there. 


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pow_hnd
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16/04/2019 10:08 am  

To each their own, but fuck hard boots. 


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Lonz
 Lonz
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16/04/2019 10:49 am  

I can see why you would feel that way, but, as a blanket statement, you're wrong.  Out of the box, hardboots are pretty fucking terrible, but they can be made to ride just as well as softies.  I've been on hardboots for two years now, and until recently, I did not think that was true - I was just willing to accept the decrease in ride quality in trade for the touring advantages.  The weight reduction, longer strides and better side-hilling and general edge control definitely make hardboots worth it for people who do long tours.  But the moment you find yourself having to use a boot crampon to boot pack an icy steep is when the extent of the superiority of hardboots as a backcountry travel tool becomes truly evident. 

It has taken a lot of modification work to make everything click, but, after two seasons of tinkering and a few dozen hours of messing around, my hardboots ride exactly like softboots, but tour way, way better.  I'm planning to record a video detailing my mods and displaying the range of motion and flex to post on another forum in next week.  I'll post it here then too.  My boots are probably the most frankensteined boots in the world right now, honestly.  I've never recorded a video and I don't have a youtube account, though, so it may take a little bit of fiddling around.

The new Phantom spring lever is a game changer.  With that piece bolted on the back and bunch of cutting and swapping of materials, you can have the best of both worlds.


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pow_hnd
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16/04/2019 11:08 am  
Posted by: Lonz

I can see why you would feel that way, but, as a blanket statement, you're wrong.  Out of the box, hardboots are pretty fucking terrible, but they can be made to ride just as well as softies.  I've been on hardboots for two years now, and until recently, I did not think that was true - I was just willing to accept the decrease in ride quality in trade for the touring advantages.  The weight reduction, longer strides and better side-hilling and general edge control definitely make hardboots worth it for people who do long tours.  But the moment you find yourself having to use a boot crampon to boot pack an icy steep is when the extent of the superiority of hardboots as a backcountry travel tool becomes truly evident. 

It has taken a lot of modification work to make everything click, but, after two seasons of tinkering and a few dozen hours of messing around, my hardboots ride exactly like softboots, but tour way, way better.  I'm planning to record a video detailing my mods and displaying the range of motion and flex to post on another forum in next week.  I'll post it here then too.  My boots are probably the most frankensteined boots in the world right now, honestly.  I've never recorded a video and I don't have a youtube account, though, so it may take a little bit of fiddling around.

The new Phantom spring lever is a game changer.  With that piece bolted on the back and bunch of cutting and swapping of materials, you can have the best of both worlds.

Absolutley almost none of that applies to me. 

1. I live in Wasangeles, we are lucky here, really no such thing as a long flat approach. You get out of your car basically at the bottom of your run and go up. Applies to 90% of the Wasatch, LCC, BCC and Millcreek. ( I do know that this is super unique to SLC, I've lived other places )

2. If you buy the right stuff there is no weight trade off compared to a normal hard boot setup. Having a carbon Prior deck and Arc Pros more than covers the weight difference for me between hard/soft boots paired with about 95% of split boards made. ( Amplid Milligram and Jones Carbon are the only other decks in the same weight realm as a carbon Prior deck ) 

3. For me, I don't ride shit where I need boot crampons. It's just not my jam. Maybe once a year do I find my self in that situation and have been making due for about 20 years. Once again, Wasangeles, I need verts in pow all the time, but really never need crampons. 

4. If I am struggling with side-hilling enough that its an issue, I just put on my Spark Crampons on my deck and it does the trick. Once again, I have this issue only once or twice a year. ( Wasangeles, shit here is pretty much straight up ) 

5. I have enough issues getting my boots to fit my fucked up feet as it is. I don't need to multiply that by 2. 

 

Once again, to each their own. I have toured many days with peeps that rock hard boots, they will never be my jam. 


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