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The Official Splitboard Splitty Thread  

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matty
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16/04/2019 11:27 am  

I bought a splitboard for relatively low-hassle early/late season laps and occasional use out the boundary gates at my local so that I could get out a little further and find more lines. I am very willing to sacrifice some touring functionality in order to maximize my snowboarding functionality and fun. I believe you that hard boot setups are better for touring, but if they were really able to function as well for snowboarding as soft boots do, then we'd have Damien Sanders making a comeback.

While the overwhelming majority of time splitboarding is spent touring, for me the overwhelming majority of the enjoyment comes from the snowboarding - and that's the reason I'm out there. I have no interest in jeopardizing that enjoyment with a hard boot set up that compromises my ride down.

Here in the PNW, we see people in the backcountry all the time who are awesome at the touring part but not as awesome at the riding/skiing part. They seem to prioritize the touring. Maybe a hard boot setup would be more applicable for them?


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kimchi
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16/04/2019 11:36 am  
Posted by: matty

Here in the PNW, we see people in the backcountry all the time who are awesome at the touring part but not as awesome at the riding/skiing part. They seem to prioritize the touring. Maybe a hard boot setup would be more applicable for them?

Pretty new to backcountry, but this has surprisingly been my experience. Past couple times out I was with skiers who were absolutely beasting me on the tour up, but were pretty mediocre on the downhill. 


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matty
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16/04/2019 11:42 am  
Posted by: kimchi
Posted by: matty

Here in the PNW, we see people in the backcountry all the time who are awesome at the touring part but not as awesome at the riding/skiing part. They seem to prioritize the touring. Maybe a hard boot setup would be more applicable for them?

Pretty new to backcountry, but this has surprisingly been my experience. Past couple times out I was with skiers who were absolutely beasting me on the tour up, but were pretty mediocre on the downhill. 

Nose posted some footage pre-season of some REI types on splitboards at Stevens who, after touring up to the top, were literally rocking a full falling leaf descent. I haven't seen anything that bad, but plenty of people who were noticeably intermediate on the downhill who were like ultra-marathoners on the uphill.


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Spenser
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16/04/2019 1:17 pm  

There can be a certain allure to splitting, like ski touring or mountaineering, where I’m not surprised to see people get into it who haven’t spent much time actually riding beforehand.

Naturally, we have a pretty big outdoor studies program at the university in town, and a lot of the ODS kids get into backcountry travel courses without already being skiers/riders. My favorite is the new awkward skier girls with 70 pound packs on their back.

One of my best friends, who crushes natural terrain on a board, was in one of those courses when he was in school. He was the only one with any skill, and all the other kids in the class thought he was this super badass guy. All he had to do was catch a small amount of air or make a couple actual turns to blow their minds, hah.

I really enjoy the way up… For me, it is meditative and can be one of the most effective doses of medicine I can get. But, if I weren’t at least decent on the way down to where it was fun, I don’t think I would have even considered getting into it. Some people get into it because it’s a cool outdoor activity like mountain biking, kayaking, or whatever.  It’s another place for them to “flex” and buy a bunch of expensive technical gear. I like splitting because I like snowboarding 😬

This post was modified 2 months ago by Spenser

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Hai
 Hai
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16/04/2019 4:01 pm  
Posted by: matty

I bought a splitboard for relatively low-hassle early/late season laps and occasional use out the boundary gates at my local so that I could get out a little further and find more lines. I am very willing to sacrifice some touring functionality in order to maximize my snowboarding functionality and fun. I believe you that hard boot setups are better for touring, but if they were really able to function as well for snowboarding as soft boots do, then we'd have Damien Sanders making a comeback.

While the overwhelming majority of time splitboarding is spent touring, for me the overwhelming majority of the enjoyment comes from the snowboarding - and that's the reason I'm out there. I have no interest in jeopardizing that enjoyment with a hard boot set up that compromises my ride down.

Here in the PNW, we see people in the backcountry all the time who are awesome at the touring part but not as awesome at the riding/skiing part. They seem to prioritize the touring. Maybe a hard boot setup would be more applicable for them?

That's like 90% of TAYs folks. Nothing wrong with that but I have friends with touring setups who are at best solid intermediate skiers. Friends of friends who learned to ski by learning to tour never setting foot in the resort.

 

I've been splitting for like 4 seasons now and still consider myself barely competent compared to my skiing buddies, in lots of variable terrain, bushwacking in trees, lots of traversing, valleys etc I've arrived at the transitions exhausted even though my general fitness level is equal or greater than theirs. That has affected the ride down not being as enjoyable and sometimes just survival mode. I'm considering a hardboot setup just so I can keep up. When its just splitboarders out not a huge deal we're all about the same but a softboot setup is inherently a disadvantage. There's lots of things you can do to mitigate that with softboots by going to the extremely stiff side of things but then you're basically riding hardboots and at a significant weight disadvantage. 


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kimchi
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16/04/2019 4:32 pm  

I'm befuddled by why anyone would get into the backcountry without first becoming a solid rider on lifts (at least beyond the cost issue-- but let's be real, the front-end costs of touring are pretty damn significant).

Most of getting better at riding/skiing is just putting in your reps. I rode lifts at Kirkwood this past weekend, and put in 20k+ feet oof vert n a pretty leisurely day. The weekend before at Lassen, I put in probably 10x the effort to ride 1/10th the vertical. The ascent is awesome, but there's only so many opportunities to get better when you get so little downhill time.


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Hai
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16/04/2019 4:56 pm  
Posted by: kimchi

I'm befuddled by why anyone would get into the backcountry without first becoming a solid rider on lifts (at least beyond the cost issue-- but let's be real, the front-end costs of touring are pretty damn significant).

Most of getting better at riding/skiing is just putting in your reps. I rode lifts at Kirkwood this past weekend, and put in 20k+ feet oof vert n a pretty leisurely day. The weekend before at Lassen, I put in probably 10x the effort to ride 1/10th the vertical. The ascent is awesome, but there's only so many opportunities to get better when you get so little downhill time.

I dunno, why do people hike in the summer? I hate that shit yet every trailhead is swamped in the PNW. Just like people who have been skiing/boarding for 20 years and never get off groomers, they like to just chill on mellow terrain, people who tour or teleski often due it for fitness/views/solitude. Not everyone is trying to get after it. More gnar for the rest of us


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kimchi
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16/04/2019 5:28 pm  

It's not even a question of whether they enjoy it, for me it's a matter of safety-- for them, potential partners, and other groups. I can't imagine venturing out into the backcountry without a pretty strong foundation as a rider. Accidents that'd be pretty inconsequential at the resort becomes significantly higher consequence without ski patrol. You can mitigate that to an extent with research and careful route selection, but sometimes something gnarlier than you anticipated is the safest option.


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Spenser
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16/04/2019 7:22 pm  

You hate hiking?


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c.fuzzy
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16/04/2019 9:00 pm  

Oh Yeah. Been out with individuals that take almost a perverse pleasure in the uphill. It's like a marathon runner pump for them I think. Like winter cardio conditioning for their imaginary Ironman triathlon and they're just given'er.

And then once they summit it's like they deflate and they have no real stoke for the down. In fact I've been out with one that just wanted to split back down due to various "concerns" of which I believe were likely just cover for the fact that they weren't a very strong rider. Or maybe they just really wanted to have a good story about how they had to 'pull the plug'. Good for them I guess.

No doubt some days I get a good rhythm and endorphin rush and really enjoy myself on the ups. And I can get into the whole pointlessness of climbing anything, waht for the existential pursuits or whatever.

But I'm in the BC for the pow. 

donuts


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Spenser
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17/04/2019 2:29 am  

Sounds like you have had enough bad, annoying experiences to make you feel that way.


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89c51
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17/04/2019 5:39 am  

More and more mountaineering people seem to get into it lately (ski touring mostly). Conquer the peak type of guys. Got to talk with a guy who was riding the resort with the purpose of getting better at skiing so he can tour. At least he acknowledged that he wasn't that good and didn't just jumped into the backcountry.

TBH i'd love to ride some lines i see in pictures of friends split boarding but fuuuuuuuuck i hate the whole hiking thing :/. And i am kind of afraid that my powder hunger will get me into trouble. :/


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Hai
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17/04/2019 8:20 am  
Posted by: Spenser

You hate hiking?

Hiking just to hike? Fuck yea I hate that shit. Boring as hell. If I want views I'll just climb up 12 pitches(and hike in 3 miles)

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Peter
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17/04/2019 10:48 am  

^^^ agreed! Where do you climb at usually?


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jerklin
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17/04/2019 10:57 am  

Climbing just to climb? Boring as hell. If I want views, I take the heli up.

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