The Official Splitb...
 

The Official Splitboard Splitty Thread  

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drmoebius
(@drmoebius)
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17/04/2019 11:51 am  

So just to be clear, I would never ever dream of skiing down what I have hiked up. But I'll stick with it, the hardboots are not much different to a stiff softboot, it's just that the system is better geared towards going up.

The thing is, the older I get the more I just want to get out for an afternoon, or maybe even tour up the resort after it has been closed for the day (which you are allowed to where I live). The ride down is an added bonus, but it is about doing some sports. I also do not fancy resort riding as much as I used to.

In regards to the AT skiers that do not know how to ski: We also have those here, but it also has to do with dedicated AT skis and boots/bindings. Compared to regular skiing equipment that stuff is not nearly as stiff and burly, so it's more akin to riding down on a park noodle with a soft binding/boot combo. Another aspect is that choppy terrain out of bonds is just shittier to ride on skis. 

Anyway, went out again today with freshly filed TLT6s, making them even better. While the ride is definitely not powder anymore, it's still fun.

today   1


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Hai
 Hai
(@redlude97)
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17/04/2019 12:48 pm  
Posted by: Peter

^^^ agreed! Where do you climb at usually?

PNW so Leavenworth, Squamish, Index, Goldbar etc, with annual trips to Smith/Yosemite/Red Rock etc. Headed to Zion in May


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Hai
 Hai
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17/04/2019 12:50 pm  
Posted by: jerklin

Climbing just to climb? Boring as hell. If I want views, I take the heli up.

Image result for airwolf

Touche, since no one in this thread seems to enjoy the touring aspect, maybe we should all get rid of our splitboards and just heliboard all the time  👍 


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Hai
 Hai
(@redlude97)
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17/04/2019 12:51 pm  

This is the type of hiking I can get behind


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pow_hnd
(@pow_hnd)
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17/04/2019 1:12 pm  
Posted by: Hai
Posted by: jerklin

Climbing just to climb? Boring as hell. If I want views, I take the heli up.

Image result for airwolf

Touche, since no one in this thread seems to enjoy the touring aspect, maybe we should all get rid of our splitboards and just heliboard all the time  👍 

I love both aspects of it 👌.... but Heli days can’t be beat 


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jerklin
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17/04/2019 3:09 pm  
Posted by: Hai
Posted by: jerklin

Climbing just to climb? Boring as hell. If I want views, I take the heli up.

Image result for airwolf

Touche, since no one in this thread seems to enjoy the touring aspect, maybe we should all get rid of our splitboards and just heliboard all the time  👍 

I've actually never been on a splitboard, mainly due to cost and lack of interest from the people I ride with. However, if I can find a good deal on a 167W Split BRD that will change soon.

I always enjoy hiking though, in the winter and the summer. It's mentally and physically stimulating, involves planning, exploration, and gets me outdoors. Climbing is just hiking with steeper inclines, but to each their own. I have friends who just want to ride park all day and don't see the point in waking up early or hiking for good snow.


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tp1_kenobi
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17/04/2019 6:51 pm  

Plenty of Europeans I've seen and met that tour, snowshoe, split, whatever.  Australians I've met in the BC of Japan are notorious for boot packing and slogging through the ridiculous amount of snow.  I've met hard booters splitting and they've raved about their setups.  I tour with skiers who give me a hard time being slower on the transitions, but I tell them to get bent.  If they wanted someone to tour with, then they're gonna have to wait an extra 30 seconds which makes no difference if it took like 3 hours to get to the top.  Anyways, as long as you're not putting others in danger, have a go and enjoy it.

I think it does take a certain personality to want to tour up a mountain regardless of skill, but we've all seen that guy race up but can't ride for shit down.  Hell, I'm all for a trail that's been broken and seeing someone traverse a sketchy zone first so I know what to approach or avoid.  

As long as you're stoked, why rain on someone else's parade?  There's enough of those people out in the BC.


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MarkusM
(@markusm)
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17/04/2019 11:22 pm  

i love hiking both in winter and summer. 


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tp1_kenobi
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18/04/2019 4:41 am  

Finally picked up the Split Brd with the Plum bindings which I’ve been eyeing for like 3 years. The board has a cm of camber and it extends past the inserts.

The bindings are solid. Lighter than my Spark Magnetos and the build quality feels better, albeit at a higher cost. The setup of the bindings took an evening to assemble and position on the board and I'm pretty happy I don't have to deal w/ pucks. Also the bindings are using the NOW straps which are f'ing burly. 

BA850173 BD01 4868 A1E7 B3165F7D8DC0
11F7C34D C588 4721 9F1D 4719E2C04592

This post was modified 1 month ago by tp1_kenobi

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Mariner9
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27/04/2019 3:10 pm  

My impression is that speed on the uptrack is more a function of fitness and technique than soft vs. hardboots. The Jones/32 boots deal with the issue of longer stride length when touring and although hardboots are better for sidehilling or traversing, those typically make up a very small fraction of the ascent. 

I'd be happy to give hardboots a try but the cost is a big ask and I haven't yet found any opportunities to demo a setup here in BC. 

@ Hai - my experience has been that if you pick the hikes with a lot of distance and/or vertical and no camping, the trails are much less crowded. I had a couple of mountains to myself over the summer/fall last year following that strategy. Either that or just go for an alpine start and you'll be finishing when everyone else is starting. : )


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pow_hnd
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27/04/2019 7:01 pm  
Posted by: Mariner9

My impression is that speed on the uptrack is more a function of fitness and technique than soft vs. hardboots. The Jones/32 boots deal with the issue of longer stride length when touring and although hardboots are better for sidehilling or traversing, those typically make up a very small fraction of the ascent. 

I'd be happy to give hardboots a try but the cost is a big ask and I haven't yet found any opportunities to demo a setup here in BC. 

@ Hai - my experience has been that if you pick the hikes with a lot of distance and/or vertical and no camping, the trails are much less crowded. I had a couple of mountains to myself over the summer/fall last year following that strategy. Either that or just go for an alpine start and you'll be finishing when everyone else is starting. : )

On a pure uptrack, no, hardboots are no better than soft boots.

When the skin track is more flat, basically anything where you wouldn’t be using a riser, hardboots are more effective in having a nice long stride and you can make better time with them.

They are generally lighter than 80% of softboot setups as well. If you’ve got a carbon deck, Spark Pros and the right boots, the weight is about the same, give or take a few OZ. 

For kicking steps, hardboots are the absolute winners, it’s no contest.

But when it comes to sidehilling, my opinion is it’s more about technique and experience. I’ve been on the same skinner as both hardbooters and skiers and they have struggled  on sidehills and never really faired any better than myself and in several cases faired worse.

Once again, technique, weighting, the exact placement of your next stride have had worlds more impact on sidehilling then the type of slippers people had on. 

 


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tp1_kenobi
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10/05/2019 12:00 am  

Damn it!  


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CJS
 CJS
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10/05/2019 8:54 am  
Posted by: pow_hnd
Posted by: Mariner9

My impression is that speed on the uptrack is more a function of fitness and technique than soft vs. hardboots. The Jones/32 boots deal with the issue of longer stride length when touring and although hardboots are better for sidehilling or traversing, those typically make up a very small fraction of the ascent. 

I'd be happy to give hardboots a try but the cost is a big ask and I haven't yet found any opportunities to demo a setup here in BC. 

@ Hai - my experience has been that if you pick the hikes with a lot of distance and/or vertical and no camping, the trails are much less crowded. I had a couple of mountains to myself over the summer/fall last year following that strategy. Either that or just go for an alpine start and you'll be finishing when everyone else is starting. : )

On a pure uptrack, no, hardboots are no better than soft boots.

When the skin track is more flat, basically anything where you wouldn’t be using a riser, hardboots are more effective in having a nice long stride and you can make better time with them.

They are generally lighter than 80% of softboot setups as well. If you’ve got a carbon deck, Spark Pros and the right boots, the weight is about the same, give or take a few OZ. 

For kicking steps, hardboots are the absolute winners, it’s no contest.

But when it comes to sidehilling, my opinion is it’s more about technique and experience. I’ve been on the same skinner as both hardbooters and skiers and they have struggled  on sidehills and never really faired any better than myself and in several cases faired worse.

Once again, technique, weighting, the exact placement of your next stride have had worlds more impact on sidehilling then the type of slippers people had on. 

 

Man these seem so simple...nice.  Can't wait to hear the report on how they ride.


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c.fuzzy
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15/05/2019 6:43 am  

The first softboot / hardboot?

2019 05 15 08 37 23 Home   Deeluxe

 

donuts


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Mig
 Mig
(@migfullbag)
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15/05/2019 8:12 am  

Not the first. A boot Kemper did in the late 80s that had the plastic bottom of a mountaineering boot with the upper of a stiff softboot comes to mind.

Those Deeluxe are not designed for splitboarding. More of an experiment to make a hybrid boot due to the increasing popularity of sofboot carving. Saw a carving video of them in use a while ago.

This post was modified 6 days ago by Mig

~6' or 182cm | way too fat | US 10.5 - Mondo 28.5
Quiver: Fullbag boards 154 to 181 cm | powder/carving/snowsurf
Boots: Burton Driver X with Scarpa Plus Fit High Liners and custom powerstrap
Bindings: Ride El Hefe | Now Drive


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