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Spenser
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03/06/2019 1:11 pm  

Exactly. And I was going to say, even spacers that say they are a certain width are not always correct.

When I worked in the shop, it was very common that people didn’t use spacers (if they knew about them in the first place), or even the little washers. It’s also pretty common for skaters to think it’s better to leave your wheels slightly loose, so they can move side to side, which of course is not true at all.  And, it’s often exactly what leads to axle slip over time.

That said, with typical street/park skating, it’s easy to get away with doing it “wrong.” But, why not just do it right?


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c.fuzzy
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03/06/2019 2:30 pm  

Spacers of course. But yeah, idk why they weren't standard issue in skating when I was learning about putting my setup together. Maybe because of the tiny bearing condom wheels of the early 90s? I mean...gear back then was pretty crude a lot of the time. It was either bomb proof over built and heavy flintstone shit, or technically garbage. I suppose not all that different than early snowboard gear. 

I remember having to tappy tap tap some of my trucks on the curb every trick or two just to get it to roll. Once we started using spacers it wasn't so bad, depending on the trucks.

One thing I just remembered is when skinny boards took over a lot of the old trucks were too wide and when the bard got banged around those axels took the brunt of the force and made them start to float pretty quick. But you had to have a skinny board and little wheels. You were pretty lame if you were riding wide boards and big wheels. But if you couldn't afford a whole new school setup, trucks were the last to get replaced.

 

donuts


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Elektropow
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04/06/2019 10:18 am  
Posted by: Mig

If the spacers make a rattling sound when rolling or are too wide to fit the wheel core bearing seat spacing, then they are not the right size. There are generally two wheel core spacings, 0.400" and 0.300",  that use what the industry calls 10mm and 8mm spacers. If you have the right spacer width matching your wheel core bearing seat spacing, you should be able to tighten the axle nut snugly without anything rattling or the bearings pinching. It makes for a quieter and more precise ride, makes the bearings last much longer and withstand loads better, and eliminates sliping axles problems.

I dunno, i used to ride with spacers about 15 years ago but still got slipping axles, but maybe stuff was worse spec back then. 

And as spense pointed out, even the corrent ones did not necessarily fit well. More often than being a matter of width it was a matter of circumference; they would move around even though the fit was good from nut to truck and between bearings. Never found "quiet ones", whether they came with the bearings or used aftermarket ones.

But yeah, no official standardization and lack of interest from skate shit manufacturers to pay more for tighter tolerances is probably what makes it tricky.


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Velvet Hammer
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10/06/2019 9:37 am  

Erick Winkowski with 169 hollow Indy’s and Super Juice wheels 

352CDBFA C79C 4A80 8A1D 0EA6A1373730

I only rode it for about 30 minutes in my driveway and the street in front of my house, did a couple small grinds and ollies on the sidewalk. I like the really wide 80’s shape it’s a fun change. The super juice wheels blow chunks, literally 

5D81E3A7 518C 41C4 ACA5 2254A9249184

 

 

This post was modified 3 months ago by Velvet Hammer

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Spenser
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10/06/2019 4:54 pm  

Damn, all that chipping from your short session?

I had a pair of UFO (super OG 😜) cruiser wheels many years ago, which I rode a lot. That was the only set where I got any chipping at all, but it was all very minor and cosmetic. Considering how much skating I did on those, they lasted very well.

I have been very happy with my 56mm bones rough riders. They have been the perfect wheel for my hybrid “skateable” cruiser.

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Spenser
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10/06/2019 5:25 pm  

I just retired my favorite cruiser to date - an 8.75 killing floor. Here are my two current setups, neither of which I have skated much at all. They are the same creature deck, but the cruiser is about 8.6, and the regular one is about 8.3. They are each about .3” narrower at the back truck, which I find I really like. It feels as though I get the benefit of the wider portion and the narrower portion at the same time, much like a tapered snowboard. Stability and surface area, yet maneuverability and quickness. I also like the concave of this model a lot… relatively flat. I have never had a preference as far as that goes, but there is something about these decks that I really like.

Obviously have not done it to the narrower one, but as of the past bunch of years, I sand off graphics and either leave the wood grain, or paint them black. I am thinking about sanding them both, and then doing a couple poly coats to really get the grain to pop, and add some durability and waterproofing for the occasional wet patch of pavement.

CEAFC40F 0A09 435D B30A 0DB2B1710939

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Elektropow
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11/06/2019 9:57 am  

Nice! It's funny how the rough riders have so much rebound. For 80d they're not very all terrain or smooth (damp?), but very versatile and more skateable. I have the 56s as well, but now use a pair of pink globe 60mm I snatched for about 10 euros. Feel as good as any cruiser wheel.

I longed for some weight savings from my cruiser and switched to narrow Theeve Titanium's and a 7.75 deck with a relatively flat shape. Not my favourite deck, but snapping spontaneous quick ollies are a breeze now Vs the old 8.25 with wide Indies. Not as stable, but more transportable.


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Spenser
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11/06/2019 11:58 am  

Yeah, they are definitely not as damp as a larger soft wheel, but they are close enough. A little more “feel” but still really grippy. That was one of the ways in which I got a lighter setup, paired with the titanium indys.

My other favorite cruiser wheels had always been something around 60mm / 78a


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Velvet Hammer
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11/06/2019 2:16 pm  
Posted by: Spenser

Yeah, they are definitely not as damp as a larger soft wheel, but they are close enough. A little more “feel” but still really grippy. That was one of the ways in which I got a lighter setup, paired with the titanium indys.

My other favorite cruiser wheels had always been something around 60mm / 78a

Yeah, 60mm 78a is what the OJ Super juice wheels are rated. I'm still riding them, put in an hour yesterday of pretty hard riding no more new chunks. I really like the wheels, you can run over most things. Sidewalk cracks are no problem. I just ordered some Slime ball OG wheels 60mm 78a, for my other deck.


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Spenser
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11/06/2019 3:05 pm  

I don’t have any issues with the rough riders, they still roll over everything I need them to, but occasionally I do miss that buttery smooth feeling of the larger wheel. The last ones I used were arbors, actually.. 61/78, the “Bogart” made with sucrose. Thought they were great!

For hard wheels, nothing for me beats a Spitfire formula four 99a


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matty
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11/06/2019 3:08 pm  

I got Spitfire 80HD Chargers. Meant to get 58 mm wheels, but accidentally ended up with 56s. I have only rolled around on them a little bit, but they seem promising for cruising and carving around the skatepark.


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Elektropow
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12/06/2019 12:07 am  

Yeah the rough riders are grippy and for some reason bones wheels are lighter than others, hard or soft. The 56mm rough riders are very light if that matters. There's the hardness spec, but there's definitely other variables as well. The slowest cruiser wheels with 78 or 80d specs were the krooked krooked ones I had about 10 years ago. OJs were good. Tried some spitfire 92d's that were super fast but not very grippy. 

Rollin around in Berlin, we would always go everywhere on our boards, one day a whole 50km of cruising, and noticed my brother was always floating further with less effort on 56mm OJs than me on the rough riders. Guess the flat just wasn't that compatible with the urethane. But for a soft wheel they felt great on some tricks, not soggy.

For my regular setup, I always use Bones stf 51 or 52mm, might be the v3 shape, but they're getting super expensive. Some other no name brands have started ordering from either the same factory where the formula 4's or stf come from (close enough), that you can get for 20eur a set vs the 50eur..


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Velvet Hammer
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12/06/2019 4:29 am  

+1 for Spitfire formula four 99a 

great wheels, best shape on the classics


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Spenser
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12/06/2019 3:02 pm  

Yeah, I love them for a park wheel. Just grippy enough to feel controlled, but easy to break loose.  I think the ones I have now are the conical 52s

I also have a set of the 101A, and once I got used to them being kind of slippery, they were really fun. Extremely fun for all kinds of powerslide situations… Pretending to do long pow slashes on banks, etc. I have tried my hardest to get them to flatspot, and I just couldn’t. On the other hand, I had a pair of classics before them that would flatspot every time I skated.

I also have a set of bones STF in the 99A equivalent, and they feel pretty similar to me. I still prefer the spitfires, though.

You are right that rough riders don’t feel soggy - that is one of my favorite things about them, within being a softer wheel. I believe they have a pretty thorough core, which I think contributes to that feeling. I didn’t really have any issues skating my larger wheels on cruisers, but the bones definitely feel more natural when doing so.  I also like the small but wide look 😜

This post was modified 2 months ago by Spenser

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Elektropow
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13/06/2019 12:15 pm  

Yeah I wonder why it took spitfire so long to up their game. So many blind fanboys me thinks. Always when I got a pair of the classics or some other wheel from them they wore out quick or flatspotted. Before the bones stf came about, which got a proper reputation quickly and for a reason, the absolute best hard wheels were darkstars. People thought I was crazy. Dull brand but only the stf that came a bit later could match them in quality. Harder than 101a, but no flatspots and lasted long.

Edit: how you could usually recognize a better urethane was that it did not have phosphor ie. it did not turn yellow in sun sunlight.

This post was modified 2 months ago by Elektropow

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