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Peter
(@peteri)
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Evo started out in a garage in the Seattle area. Their initial business plan was to buy demo fleets from resorts, clean em, and sell em as used setups. Still do that to this day


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Mr. Irrelevant
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so it sounds like they were smart and saw where things were going from a web based retail model and took advantage of that. something that anyone could have seen? idk why i was randomly thinking about this. i want to say that knowing that those are their roots makes me slightly more ok with giving them my money vs. a local brick and mortar. i might just be bitter that satellite in boulder seems to be going more on the skate side than what i've known them as in the past couple years. loved going to that place and shooting the shit with the doods there. they relocated to a smaller place and i dropped in recently and they had next to nothing available. was super bummed


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matty
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Evo's owner, Bryce Phillips, apparently started to do the buy used gear and resell it thing when he was a kid, and it grew and grew through high school and college and became an actual business. He ended up skiing professionally for K2, and I think that helped him to leverage connections to get access to more and more gear along the way. He started selling online as "evogear.com" in 2001, and a few years later in 2005 they set up their first brick and mortar. I think that around that time is when they added snowboard sales?

He also does residential and commercial real estate development, leasing, and sales, which I think has helped to protect his margins. One of his projects is a multi-use development up at Snoqualmie that brought a microbrewery and restaurant in (along with some higher-end condos) that have really become kind of the heart of the local community up there.

Phillips is still the principal owner from what I know, and the brick and mortar here in Seattle sponsors and hosts a lot of snow, skate, and mountain bike stuff. Do they do the same through their Portland and Denver locations? I know that Phillips has said that one of his goals has been to help to support a healthy local snow/skate/bike scene through the store. They built an indoor skatepark at the shop that they make available to a lot of nonprofits for youth development stuff and that gets used to host competition events and for kids to take skate lessons.

One thing that I also think should not be overlooked is the way that evo promotes from within. I know a few people who have grown from retail positions to retail management and on to writing copy for the website and working as product category buyers. I think that helps to make sure that the people making decisions about product and setting the culture in the shops are people who really love snowboarding, skiing, skating, and mountain biking, and are committed participants who have first-hand knowledge about what the customers want - and who get rewarded for really investing themselves into the activities that they're passionate about. A few of the people at evo here in Seattle have been riding at Snoqualmie on Wednesday evenings almost every week that night skiing happens during the season as kind of an unofficial meet-up, and they always welcome friends and customers to join them for laps. A few times, a bunch of employees from their warehouse have been there, too. It's cool to see that the people who work there really want to share the stoke. Evo also uses their gallery space to promote their employees' artistic efforts and a bunch of the local PNW pro riders have been sponsored by evo.


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Mr. Irrelevant
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^all good things to hear! i've been to one event at the denver location (yoder's Right to Roam showing) and know they've done other things. i've said it before...i would love to see them put together a demo day like you guys have had with the japanese brands. that would very much be rad. maybe i'll swing in and start chatting someone up and see if we can get it going


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matty
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Posted by: Mr. Irrelevant

^all good things to hear! i've been to one event at the denver location (yoder's Right to Roam showing) and know they've done other things. i've said it before...i would love to see them put together a demo day like you guys have had with the japanese brands. that would very much be rad. maybe i'll swing in and start chatting someone up and see if we can get it going

Do it! Mention that you know that dudes at the Seattle store set up an informal, private, free demo for Moss last year and Gentemstick the year before that - and that at least half of the people who attended the Moss demo ended up buying boards. Also - the dudes from Moss (US rep, a couple of Japanese pros) came back through several weeks later and the same evo dudes set up a movie screening at a local bar for a couple of Japanese shred movies that those Japanese riders were in (Niseko Downchill movies) and then the next day set up a group meet up and ride with those Japanese dudes again. That's the bar that the folks at the Denver and Portland locations should be looking to live up to.


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Mr. Irrelevant
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Posted by: matty
Posted by: Mr. Irrelevant

^all good things to hear! i've been to one event at the denver location (yoder's Right to Roam showing) and know they've done other things. i've said it before...i would love to see them put together a demo day like you guys have had with the japanese brands. that would very much be rad. maybe i'll swing in and start chatting someone up and see if we can get it going

Do it! Mention that you know that dudes at the Seattle store set up an informal, private, free demo for Moss last year and Gentemstick the year before that - and that at least half of the people who attended the Moss demo ended up buying boards. Also - the dudes from Moss (US rep, a couple of Japanese pros) came back through several weeks later and the same evo dudes set up a movie screening at a local bar for a couple of Japanese shred movies that those Japanese riders were in (Niseko Downchill movies) and then the next day set up a group meet up and ride with those Japanese dudes again. That's the bar that the folks at the Denver and Portland locations should be looking to live up to.

totally agree, thats such an awesome way to build the community here and get involved in it (if they aren't already). i should be able to tap into this place, my normal crew, and maybe dmq and get enough people that would be interested and show up


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PacEnDubya
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Timberline's season pass price increase is painful.  2020 = $499; 2021 = $549; 2022 = $749 ($850 for the Fusion Pass).  36% increase since last year and 50% increase vs. 2020.  I imagine that fewer season passes will be sold, which on one (selfish) hand is great- if the result is a less crowded resort.  On the other hand, I have to cross my fingers that the place isn't filled with an overwhelming amount of yuppie douchers.


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unsatisfiedus
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both of those outcomes seem likely with that rate of increase  

 


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